Australia, September 2022

Terrigal Beach, Central Coast, New South Wales

12th September 2022

Tony with his surfing instructor on Terrigal Beach. There are a row of surfboards and Tony is lying on one of them.
Tony with his surfing instructor on Terrigal Beach. There are a row of surfboards and Tony is lying on one of them.
Tony practising positioning himself on the surfboard. He is using his arms to raise himself up on to his knees.
Tony practising positioning himself on the surfboard. He is using his arms to raise himself up on to his knees.
Tony with his instructor on the beach.
Tony with his instructor on the beach.
Tony practising standing on the board.
Tony practising standing on the board.
Still on the beach with Tony practising on the surfboard.
Still on the beach with Tony practising on the surfboard.
Tony crouching on the surfboard. View along long sandy Terrigal Beach behind.
Tony crouching on the surfboard. View along long sandy Terrigal Beach behind.
Tony standing on the board with his instructor in front. The board is still on the beach.
Tony standing on the board with his instructor in front. The board is still on the beach.
Tony in a wet suit on Terrigal Beach, Central Coast, ready to go surfing.
Tony in a wet suit on Terrigal Beach, Central Coast, ready to go surfing.

Blue Mountains, New South Wales

The Blue Mountains are a mountainous region and mountain range in New South Wales, Australia. The region begins immediately inland of Sydney, the state capital. The area is known for its dramatic scenery including lush forest filled valleys, unusual rock formations and towering sandstone cliffs.

Wednesday, 14th September 2022

A spectacular view into the densely wooded Jamison Valley from a viewing platform with Tony and Tatiana in the foreground. The viewing platform is part of Scenic World, a tourist site, located in the town of Katoomba, at the north end of the Jamison Valley. High rocky cliffs can be seen emerging from the vegetation along the north-east side of the valley. At the top, away in the middle distance, three distinctive pinnacles of rock are visible. These pinnacles are known as the Three Sisters. They were formed by volcanic eruptions around 200 million years ago. Originally they would have been surrounded by softer sedimentary rock, which has since eroded away. The pinnacles have the following names: Meehni, Wimlah and Gunnedoo.
A spectacular view into the densely wooded Jamison Valley from a viewing platform with Tony and Tatiana in the foreground. The viewing platform is part of Scenic World, a tourist site, located in the town of Katoomba, at the north end of the Jamison Valley. High rocky cliffs can be seen emerging from the vegetation along the north-east side of the valley. At the top, away in the middle distance, three distinctive pinnacles of rock are visible. These pinnacles are known as the Three Sisters. They were formed by volcanic eruptions around 200 million years ago. Originally they would have been surrounded by softer sedimentary rock, which has since eroded away. The pinnacles have the following names: Meehni, Wimlah and Gunnedoo.
Another view of Tony and Tatiana on the viewing platform with the Jamison Valley and the Three Sisters behind. The valley is about 6.2 miles (10 km) wide and 2.5 miles (4 km) long and is 400 metres (1,300 ft) in depth. The Jamison Valley was named by Governor Lachlan Macquarie in honour of Sir John Jamison (1776-1844), a prominent landowner and physician who visited the Blue Mountains with the governor in 1815. The Aboriginal Gundungurra people are estimated to have lived in the region in and around the valley for 40,000 years.
Another view of Tony and Tatiana on the viewing platform with the Jamison Valley and the Three Sisters behind. The valley is about 6.2 miles (10 km) wide and 2.5 miles (4 km) long and is 400 metres (1,300 ft) in depth. The Jamison Valley was named by Governor Lachlan Macquarie in honour of Sir John Jamison (1776-1844), a prominent landowner and physician who visited the Blue Mountains with the governor in 1815. The Aboriginal Gundungurra people are estimated to have lived in the region in and around the valley for 40,000 years.
Again Tony and Tatiana on the viewing platform with an expansive view across the Jamison Valley.
Again Tony and Tatiana on the viewing platform with an expansive view across the Jamison Valley.
Tony and Tatiana in front of a bronze statue of a miner. The site where Scenic World now stands was once used for coal and oil shale mining. The mine opened in the 1880s and closed in 1945. A cable railway still operating on the site was originally constructed for the mine.
Tony and Tatiana in front of a bronze statue of a miner. The site where Scenic World now stands was once used for coal and oil shale mining. The mine opened in the 1880s and closed in 1945. A cable railway still operating on the site was originally constructed for the mine.
Another view of Tony and Tatiana alongside the coal miner statue. The bearded man depicted is quite short, similar in height to Tony.
Another view of Tony and Tatiana alongside the coal miner statue. The bearded man depicted is quite short, similar in height to Tony.
Tony and Tatiana sitting back in an old railway cart. This perhaps dates from when the site was a coal mine.
Tony and Tatiana sitting back in an old railway cart. This perhaps dates from when the site was a coal mine.
Tony sitting on a small bronze pit pony, which is carrying a rope and pulling a small truck of coal. Pit ponies were once commonly used in coal mines to pull wagons.
Tony sitting on a small bronze pit pony, which is carrying a rope and pulling a small truck of coal. Pit ponies were once commonly used in coal mines to pull wagons.
View from inside the Scenic Skyway, a cable-car that crosses the gorge above the Katoomba Falls. The 72-person cabins are elevated up to 270 metres (886 feet) above the valley floor. The side of the gorge can be seen, with small trees and bushes clinging to the steep sides, among areas of sheer bare rock.
View from inside the Scenic Skyway, a cable-car that crosses the gorge above the Katoomba Falls. The 72-person cabins are elevated up to 270 metres (886 feet) above the valley floor. The side of the gorge can be seen, with small trees and bushes clinging to the steep sides, among areas of sheer bare rock.
A station at one end of the Scenic Skyway. The temperate rainforest vegetation can be seen below, including tree ferns.
A station at one end of the Scenic Skyway. The temperate rainforest vegetation can be seen below, including tree ferns.
A pair of children in front filming the impressive view on their phones, while looking through one of the glass sides of the Scenic Skyway.
A pair of children in front filming the impressive view on their phones, while looking through one of the glass sides of the Scenic Skyway.
The top of the Katoomba Falls seen from the Scenic Skyway. The Kedumba River can be seen emerging from the forest and flowing over the sheer cliff at the top of the gorge.
The top of the Katoomba Falls seen from the Scenic Skyway. The Kedumba River can be seen emerging from the forest and flowing over the sheer cliff at the top of the gorge.
Dramatic view of the Katoomba Falls. The waterfall can be seen crashing down the side of the gorge in a series of segments. There are three main vertical segments or steps with a total height of around 244 metres (800 feet).
Dramatic view of the Katoomba Falls. The waterfall can be seen crashing down the side of the gorge in a series of segments. There are three main vertical segments or steps with a total height of around 244 metres (800 feet).
Another view from the Scenic Skyway. Towering cliffs with dense forest vegetation at the top and bottom.
Another view from the Scenic Skyway. Towering cliffs with dense forest vegetation at the top and bottom.
Tony on an elevated boardwalk through the ancient temperate rainforest. This is part of the Scenic Walkway where many species of native flora and fauna can be seen. The boardwalk allows the forest to be seen without visitors causing damage by eroding the trails.
Tony on an elevated boardwalk through the ancient temperate rainforest. This is part of the Scenic Walkway where many species of native flora and fauna can be seen. The boardwalk allows the forest to be seen without visitors causing damage by eroding the trails.