Italy, May 2022

Genoa

Genoa (Genova) is a historic port city in the Italian region of Liguria on the Mediterranean coast. It is the sixth largest city in Italy with a population of around 580,000. For over seven centuries, from the 11th century to 1797, the Republic of Genoa was one of Europe’s most powerful maritime republics. Particularly between the 12th century and 15th centuries the city played a leading role in European trade and became among the wealthiest cities in the world.

Sunday, 15th May 2022

A long flight of stone steps leading down from one of the higher city neighbourhoods into the heart of the lower city. The tall retaining wall alongside is decorated with terracotta and pale yellow stripes.
A long flight of stone steps leading down from one of the higher city neighbourhoods into the heart of the lower city. The tall retaining wall alongside is decorated with terracotta and pale yellow stripes.
Looking down from the flight of steps into a street below. The street contains large residential or office buildings rising to seven or eight storeys.
Looking down from the flight of steps into a street below. The street contains large residential or office buildings rising to seven or eight storeys.
The south-west corner of Piazza de Ferrari (Ferrari Square). This is the main square of Genoa situated in the heart of the city between the historical and the modern centres. On the left is the Doge's Palace (Palazzo Ducale). This three storey neoclassical palace was formerly the residence of the Doge of Genoa (the head of state of the former Republic of Genoa). Construction of the palace began at the end of the 13th century and it was completed in 1339. Several phases of rebuilding and renovation have occurred over the centuries since. Today the building is a museum and a centre for cultural and arts events.
The south-west corner of Piazza de Ferrari (Ferrari Square). This is the main square of Genoa situated in the heart of the city between the historical and the modern centres. On the left is the Doge’s Palace (Palazzo Ducale). This three storey neoclassical palace was formerly the residence of the Doge of Genoa (the head of state of the former Republic of Genoa). Construction of the palace began at the end of the 13th century and it was completed in 1339. Several phases of rebuilding and renovation have occurred over the centuries since. Today the building is a museum and a centre for cultural and arts events.
Selfie of Tony next to a large stone column within the Doge's Palace.
Selfie of Tony next to a large stone column within the Doge’s Palace.
A wide covered walkway or arcade that passes through the Doge's Palace. The ceiling is arched and supported by stone columns.
A wide covered walkway or arcade that passes through the Doge’s Palace. The ceiling is arched and supported by stone columns.
A courtyard at the far end of the arcade within the Doge's Palace when entering from Piazza de Ferrari. In view are a row of plain Tuscan columns around the courtyard, and the entrance to the Casa Luzzati, which hosts cultural exhibitions.
A courtyard at the far end of the arcade within the Doge’s Palace when entering from Piazza de Ferrari. In view are a row of plain Tuscan columns around the courtyard, and the entrance to the Casa Luzzati, which hosts cultural exhibitions.
Again in Piazza de Ferrari, this time looking towards the Palace of the Liguria Region, formerly known as Palazzo della Navigazione Generale Italiana. This is the headquarters of the Regional Council of the Liguria region and was constructed from 1912 to 1924. It is three storeys in height with a loggia at ground floor level supported by wide columns and arches above.
Again in Piazza de Ferrari, this time looking towards the Palace of the Liguria Region, formerly known as Palazzo della Navigazione Generale Italiana. This is the headquarters of the Regional Council of the Liguria region and was constructed from 1912 to 1924. It is three storeys in height with a loggia at ground floor level supported by wide columns and arches above.
Close-up of Tony outside an entrance to the Doge's Palace.
Close-up of Tony outside an entrance to the Doge’s Palace.
View into the middle of the Piazza de Ferrari showing a large fountain at its centre. The fountain, which has become a symbol of the city, was built in 1936 and was designed by the architect Giuseppe Crosa di Vergagni. It is circular in plan with many jets of water spraying from a surrounding pool up into a large pedestal in the centre. A central jet of water also rises from the middle of the pedestal.
View into the middle of the Piazza de Ferrari showing a large fountain at its centre. The fountain, which has become a symbol of the city, was built in 1936 and was designed by the architect Giuseppe Crosa di Vergagni. It is circular in plan with many jets of water spraying from a surrounding pool up into a large pedestal in the centre. A central jet of water also rises from the middle of the pedestal.
Looking towards the north-east corner of Piazza de Ferrari with the central fountain to the right. The large building towards the left of the photo houses the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti, an academy of fine arts, which was founded in 1751.
Looking towards the north-east corner of Piazza de Ferrari with the central fountain to the right. The large building towards the left of the photo houses the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti, an academy of fine arts, which was founded in 1751.
At the base of the fountain in Piazza de Ferrari with some of the many jets of water in view.
At the base of the fountain in Piazza de Ferrari with some of the many jets of water in view.
Another smaller water feature on the south-west side of Piazza de Ferrari. Several fountains can be seen spraying water up into the air from a shallow pool with the Palace of the Liguria Region in the background.
Another smaller water feature on the south-west side of Piazza de Ferrari. Several fountains can be seen spraying water up into the air from a shallow pool with the Palace of the Liguria Region in the background.
In the foreground is part of the pool at the base of the large fountain in Piazza De Ferrari. In the background on the right is the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti building and further back on the left is the Teatro Carlo Felice. The Teatro Carlo Felice is the principal opera house of Genoa and is used for performances of opera, ballet, orchestral music, and recitals.
In the foreground is part of the pool at the base of the large fountain in Piazza De Ferrari. In the background on the right is the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti building and further back on the left is the Teatro Carlo Felice. The Teatro Carlo Felice is the principal opera house of Genoa and is used for performances of opera, ballet, orchestral music, and recitals.
Piazza de Ferrari. On the left is the neoclassical façade of the Doge's Palace (Palazzo Ducale) and on the right is the Giulio Pallavicini Palace (Palazzo Giulio Pallavicini) built in 1586 by Giulio Pallavicini on the orders of his brother-in-law Gio. Batta Doria.
Piazza de Ferrari. On the left is the neoclassical façade of the Doge’s Palace (Palazzo Ducale) and on the right is the Giulio Pallavicini Palace (Palazzo Giulio Pallavicini) built in 1586 by Giulio Pallavicini on the orders of his brother-in-law Gio. Batta Doria.
Tony in the middle of Piazza de Ferrari with the large circular fountain behind.
Tony in the middle of Piazza de Ferrari with the large circular fountain behind.
The north end of Piazza de Ferrari showing the neoclassical Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti on the right with a covered walkway around the ground floor and two storeys above with green shutters covering many of the windows, and on the left, part of the Teatro Carlo Felice can be seen.
The north end of Piazza de Ferrari showing the neoclassical Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti on the right with a covered walkway around the ground floor and two storeys above with green shutters covering many of the windows, and on the left, part of the Teatro Carlo Felice can be seen.
A wide passageway leading through the Teatro Carlo Felice. The Teatro Carlo Felice opened in 1828 and is named after King Carlo Felice who reigned from 1821 to 1831. When the theatre opened it accommodated an audience of roughly 2,500 in five tiers, with a gallery above, and standing room in the orchestra pit. The building was badly damaged by several air raids during World War II and has been rebuilt. Portions of the original façade have been recreated but the interior is entirely modern. The theatre officially reopened in June 1991 with the main hall now containing up to 2,000 seats.
A wide passageway leading through the Teatro Carlo Felice. The Teatro Carlo Felice opened in 1828 and is named after King Carlo Felice who reigned from 1821 to 1831. When the theatre opened it accommodated an audience of roughly 2,500 in five tiers, with a gallery above, and standing room in the orchestra pit. The building was badly damaged by several air raids during World War II and has been rebuilt. Portions of the original façade have been recreated but the interior is entirely modern. The theatre officially reopened in June 1991 with the main hall now containing up to 2,000 seats.
View across the north part of Piazza de Ferrari from outside the Teatro Carlo Felice. A column supporting the theatre's front colonnade is in the foreground and a neoclassical building can be seen opposite.
View across the north part of Piazza de Ferrari from outside the Teatro Carlo Felice. A column supporting the theatre’s front colonnade is in the foreground and a neoclassical building can be seen opposite.
People sitting on steps leading up to the Teatro Carlo Felice's large colonnade at the main entrance. The colonnade is supported by six Tuscan columns.
People sitting on steps leading up to the Teatro Carlo Felice’s large colonnade at the main entrance. The colonnade is supported by six Tuscan columns.
View along Via Giuseppe Garibaldi, an historic street in the centre of Genoa, which was built from 1558 to 1583. It is lined with palaces and other interesting old buildings. The street is 250 metres long and 7.5 metres wide. The building with flags flying from the balcony on the left is the Carrega-Cataldi Palace (Palazzo Carrega-Cataldi). This was built from 1558 to 1561 for Tobia Pallavicino, a wealthy merchant, by architect Giovan Battista Castello. Today it houses the Genoa Chamber of Commerce. It is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site that covers 42 historic palaces in this part of the old city.
View along Via Giuseppe Garibaldi, an historic street in the centre of Genoa, which was built from 1558 to 1583. It is lined with palaces and other interesting old buildings. The street is 250 metres long and 7.5 metres wide. The building with flags flying from the balcony on the left is the Carrega-Cataldi Palace (Palazzo Carrega-Cataldi). This was built from 1558 to 1561 for Tobia Pallavicino, a wealthy merchant, by architect Giovan Battista Castello. Today it houses the Genoa Chamber of Commerce. It is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site that covers 42 historic palaces in this part of the old city.
An old metal door with stone surround that is the main entrance to the Pallavicini-Cambiaso Palace (Palazzo Pallavicini-Cambiaso) on Via Giuseppe Garibaldi. This palace dates from 1558.
An old metal door with stone surround that is the main entrance to the Pallavicini-Cambiaso Palace (Palazzo Pallavicini-Cambiaso) on Via Giuseppe Garibaldi. This palace dates from 1558.
Another metal door with a curious lion's head with human-like features carved in relief on the adjoining stone surround. This is at the entrance to the UNESCO listed Lercari Parodi Palace (Palazzo Lercari-Parodi) again on Via Giuseppe Garibaldi. The palace was built starting in 1571 by Franco Lercari, a wealthy banker, who occupied the position of governor of the Genoese Republic in the 1770s.
Another metal door with a curious lion’s head with human-like features carved in relief on the adjoining stone surround. This is at the entrance to the UNESCO listed Lercari Parodi Palace (Palazzo Lercari-Parodi) again on Via Giuseppe Garibaldi. The palace was built starting in 1571 by Franco Lercari, a wealthy banker, who occupied the position of governor of the Genoese Republic in the 1770s.

Monday, 16th May 2022

View along Via San Lorenzo, an historic street that runs for 270 metres between Piazza Raibetta and Piazza Matteotti, and which contains several old palaces. The street runs past the 12th-century Cathedral of San Lorenzo from which it takes its name. The photo mostly shows shops at ground floor level.
View along Via San Lorenzo, an historic street that runs for 270 metres between Piazza Raibetta and Piazza Matteotti, and which contains several old palaces. The street runs past the 12th-century Cathedral of San Lorenzo from which it takes its name. The photo mostly shows shops at ground floor level.
Outside the main entrance to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo (Cattedrale di San Lorenzo). The cathedral is dedicated to Saint Lawrence (San Lorenzo) and is the seat of the Archbishop of Genoa. It was consecrated by Pope Gelasius II in 1118 and was built between the 12th and 14th centuries with some later additions. The front façade is striped in white and black stone. In style it is Gothic and Romanesque.
Outside the main entrance to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo (Cattedrale di San Lorenzo). The cathedral is dedicated to Saint Lawrence (San Lorenzo) and is the seat of the Archbishop of Genoa. It was consecrated by Pope Gelasius II in 1118 and was built between the 12th and 14th centuries with some later additions. The front façade is striped in white and black stone. In style it is Gothic and Romanesque.
Close-up of Tony outside the entrance to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo.
Close-up of Tony outside the entrance to the Cathedral of San Lorenzo.
Visitors on steps leading up to the entrance of the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. Intricate stones work around the main entrance can be seen although the upper part is obscured by scaffolding. The stonework is striped and embellished with decorative columns and geometric relief carving.
Visitors on steps leading up to the entrance of the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. Intricate stones work around the main entrance can be seen although the upper part is obscured by scaffolding. The stonework is striped and embellished with decorative columns and geometric relief carving.
Drawings for sale on the pavement outside an historic palace on Via San Lorenzo. The palace is the Bendinelli Sauli Palace (Palazzo Bendinelli Sauli) which dates from the 16th century and was rebuilt in 1686.
Drawings for sale on the pavement outside an historic palace on Via San Lorenzo. The palace is the Bendinelli Sauli Palace (Palazzo Bendinelli Sauli) which dates from the 16th century and was rebuilt in 1686.
Inside San Lorenzo Cathedral with pews and marble columns in the foreground and a side chapel just visible behind with statues in alcoves.
Inside San Lorenzo Cathedral with pews and marble columns in the foreground and a side chapel just visible behind with statues in alcoves.
The main altar in San Lorenzo Cathedral with stained glass windows behind.
The main altar in San Lorenzo Cathedral with stained glass windows behind.
Another view of the main altar, which includes a carved marble base, and a large golden cross and candlesticks on top.
Another view of the main altar, which includes a carved marble base, and a large golden cross and candlesticks on top.
Looking up at interior decoration in San Lorenzo Cathedral. There are marble columns supporting arches decorated with black and white stripes. To the right is the large side chapel of San Giovanni Battista, which was built between 1450 and 1460, by Domenico Gagini da Bissone. The chapel's facade, which can partially be seen, is decorated with relief carving depicting the life of Saint John.
Looking up at interior decoration in San Lorenzo Cathedral. There are marble columns supporting arches decorated with black and white stripes. To the right is the large side chapel of San Giovanni Battista, which was built between 1450 and 1460, by Domenico Gagini da Bissone. The chapel’s facade, which can partially be seen, is decorated with relief carving depicting the life of Saint John.
View into the San Giovanni Battista chapel within San Lorenzo Cathedral. The altar can be seen with a large marble canopy above. There are stained glass windows behind and statues in alcoves mostly out of view at the sides.
View into the San Giovanni Battista chapel within San Lorenzo Cathedral. The altar can be seen with a large marble canopy above. There are stained glass windows behind and statues in alcoves mostly out of view at the sides.
Looking along one of the side aisles inside San Lorenzo Cathedral which is lined with tall marble columns.
Looking along one of the side aisles inside San Lorenzo Cathedral which is lined with tall marble columns.
An equestrian statue of Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi located in Piazza de Ferrari. Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi (1807–1882) was an Italian general, patriot, revolutionary and republican. Garibaldi contributed to Italian unification and the creation of the Kingdom of Italy. The statue was created by the Italian sculptor Augusto Rivalta in 1893.
An equestrian statue of Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi located in Piazza de Ferrari. Giuseppe Maria Garibaldi (1807–1882) was an Italian general, patriot, revolutionary and republican. Garibaldi contributed to Italian unification and the creation of the Kingdom of Italy. The statue was created by the Italian sculptor Augusto Rivalta in 1893.
Tony and Tatiana with the Giuseppe Garibaldi statue behind. The bronze statue stands on a large stone plinth.
Tony and Tatiana with the Giuseppe Garibaldi statue behind. The bronze statue stands on a large stone plinth.