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Isle of Man, July 2013

5th July 2013

Castle Street. This is one of the main shopping streets in Douglas, the Isle of Man's capital.Castle Street. This is one of the main shopping streets in Douglas, the Isle of Man’s capital.

A long narrow public garden that runs parallel to the sea front promenade (Loch Promenade). In front is a memorial to David Kewley: an employee of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company and a volunteer in the Lifeboat and Coastguard Services.A long narrow public garden that runs parallel to the sea front promenade (Loch Promenade). In front is a memorial to David Kewley: an employee of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company and a volunteer in the Lifeboat and Coastguard Services. He is credited with saving thirty people from drowning. Following his death in 1904, this memorial was paid for by public subscription.

View across Douglas Bay from the promenade. A warship away in the distance.View across Douglas Bay from the promenade. A warship away in the distance.

Looking along the sea front promenade. A long row of flag poles flying the Manx flag.Looking along the sea front promenade. A long row of flag poles flying the Manx flag.

Now looking the other way towards Douglas Harbour. To the right, the round central part of the Sea Terminal building can be seen, with a tall narrow concrete spire protruding from its centre. This construction is sometimes known as the 'lemon squeezer' because of its shape.Now looking the other way towards Douglas Harbour. To the right, the round central part of the Sea Terminal building can be seen, with a tall narrow concrete spire protruding from its centre. This construction is sometimes known as the ‘lemon squeezer’ because of its shape. The Sea Terminal is the main arrival and departure point for all the island’s passenger and car ferries.

Another view along the promenade, which is lined with a long row of brightly painted grand-looking buildings, many of them hotels and guest houses.Another view along the promenade, which is lined with a long row of brightly painted grand-looking buildings, many of them hotels and guest houses.

A man and woman in period dress, taking part in some sort of historic re-enactment. This was one of the many events taking place to celebrate Tynwald Day, the Isle of Man's national day, which is on 5th July (unless it is a Saturday or Sunday, when it moves to the following Monday). The location is Tynwald Hill, located in the centre of the island.A man and woman in period dress, taking part in some sort of historic re-enactment. This was one of the many events taking place to celebrate Tynwald Day, the Isle of Man’s national day, which is on 5th July (unless it is a Saturday or Sunday, when it moves to the following Monday). The location is Tynwald Hill, located in the centre of the island. The island’s legislature, the Tynwald, meet here to proclaim the new laws created during the preceding year, as well as other ceremonial events. Thousands of people turn out to watch and take part.

Tatiana and Tony outside the Royal Chapel of St John the Baptist. The chapel is located close to Tynwald Hill and also the village of St John.Tatiana and Tony outside the Royal Chapel of St John the Baptist. The chapel is located close to Tynwald Hill and also the village of St John. On Tynwald Day, members of the Tynwald and other dignitaries take part in a church service here. Within the church there are reserved seats with name plaques for members of both chambers of the Manx parliament. The present chapel dates from around 1849, but replaced an older church.

Tony and Tatiana inside the entrance porch of the chapel. Tony has his hand on Osruth's Cross: this 10th century Norse cross was rediscovered when the old chapel was demolished in 1847.Tony and Tatiana inside the entrance porch of the chapel. Tony has his hand on Osruth’s Cross: this 10th century Norse cross was rediscovered when the old chapel was demolished in 1847.

Tony touching the Millennium Stone. This was erected behind the Royal Chapel of St John in 1979, the 1000th anniversary of the establishment of Tynwald, the Manx Parliament.Tony touching the Millennium Stone. This was erected behind the Royal Chapel of St John in 1979, the 1000th anniversary of the establishment of Tynwald, the Manx Parliament. The foundation stones come from every parish of the Isle of Man. The Tynwald claims to be the oldest continuously operating parliament in the world.

Tynwald Fair. Lots of stalls, crowded with people.Tynwald Fair. Lots of stalls, crowded with people.

Boats in Peel's Inner Harbour. Located on the island's west coast, Peel is the Isle of Man's third largest town after Douglas and Ramsey.Boats in Peel’s Inner Harbour. Located on the island’s west coast, Peel is the Isle of Man’s third largest town after Douglas and Ramsey.

Boats moored at the quayside. Looking further into the inner harbour, which is at the mouth of the River Neb.Boats moored at the quayside. Looking further into the inner harbour, which is at the mouth of the River Neb.

Tatiana and Tony by a statue of Sir William Hillary (1771 - 1847). Hillary was a soldier, author and philanthropist, best known as the founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in 1824. The statue is at Douglas Head, a headland, which overlooks Douglas Bay.Tatiana and Tony by a statue of Sir William Hillary (1771 – 1847). Hillary was a soldier, author and philanthropist, best known as the founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in 1824. The statue is at Douglas Head, a headland, which overlooks Douglas Bay.

View of Douglas town from Douglas Head. A large passenger ferry in the port immediately below.View of Douglas town from Douglas Head. A large passenger ferry in the port immediately below.

Looking across Douglas Bay. Part of the harbour wall extending out in the foreground.Looking across Douglas Bay. Part of the harbour wall extending out in the foreground.

The harbour wall and beyond St Mary's Isle (also known as Conister Rock), a partially submerged reef within Douglas Bay. The building upon the rock is known as The Tower of Refuge.The harbour wall and beyond St Mary’s Isle (also known as Conister Rock), a partially submerged reef within Douglas Bay. The building upon the rock is known as The Tower of Refuge. It dates from 1832 and was erected on the orders of Sir William Hillary following several shipwrecks on the semi-submerged rock. He wanted a refuge for survivors until help could arrive. It was designed to look like a castle.

Tatiana relaxing on a bench. Douglas Head.Tatiana relaxing on a bench. Douglas Head.

A heavy chain, now painted gold and used decoratively, in the vicinity of Douglas Harbour.A heavy chain, now painted gold and used decoratively, in the vicinity of Douglas Harbour.

7th July 2013

Looking from a car park towards Douglas Bay. The Tower of Refuge visible on the left side.Looking from a car park towards Douglas Bay. The Tower of Refuge visible on the left side.

Tatiana touching a life-sized model of a man in medieval dress sitting at a table and holding a piece of bread. Part of a historic display at Castle Rushen, a medieval castle, located at Castletown, the Isle of Man's former capital.Tatiana touching a life-sized model of a man in medieval dress sitting at a table and holding a piece of bread. Part of a historic display at Castle Rushen, a medieval castle, located at Castletown, the Isle of Man’s former capital.

Plate containing a roast pig (not real, part of the same museum display as in the previous photo).Plate containing a roast pig.

Tony and Tatiana in front of another historic scene. A female manikin carrying a peacock on a tray. There is also a thin-looking dog to the left and a large cupboard to the right.Tony and Tatiana in front of another historic scene. A female manikin carrying a peacock on a tray.

Tatiana and Tony sitting at a long table laid with artificial plates of food. Sitting by them is a pair of male manikins in historic dress (perhaps 18th century).Tatiana and Tony sitting at a long table laid with artificial plates of food. Sitting by them is a pair of male manikins in historic dress (perhaps 18th century).

Tony and Tatiana touching yet another life-sized model. A man in a flamboyant gold-coloured outfit. Perhaps a 17th or 18th century prince.Tony and Tatiana touching yet another life-sized model. A man in a flamboyant gold-coloured outfit. Perhaps a 17th or 18th century prince.

Tony in a metal pillory. A framework with holes for securing the head and hands: historically these were used to restrain a person for the purposes of public humiliation or flogging. Taken at Castle Rushen.Tony in a metal pillory. A framework with holes for securing the head and hands: historically these were used to restrain a person for the purposes of public humiliation or flogging. Taken at Castle Rushen.

Looking up in the central courtyard of Castle Rushen: high stone walls with crenellated battlements at the top.Looking up in the central courtyard of Castle Rushen: high stone walls with crenellated battlements at the top.

A male manikin holding a rope pulley. He is standing on scaffolding constructed of wood and rope. Perhaps demonstrating historic castle construction methods.A male manikin holding a rope pulley. He is standing on scaffolding constructed of wood and rope. Perhaps demonstrating historic castle construction methods.

Sharp spikes at the bottom of a portcullis at one of the castle's entrances.Sharp spikes at the bottom of a portcullis at one of the castle’s entrances.

Tatiana and Tony touching a historic canon.Tatiana and Tony touching a historic canon.

Tony and Tatiana at an entrance into the castle.Tony and Tatiana at an entrance into the castle.

A steam train arriving at Castletown station. This narrow gauge railway runs 15.3 miles from Douglas to Port Erin.A steam train arriving at Castletown station. This narrow gauge railway runs 15.3 miles from Douglas to Port Erin.

View down the side of the red and cream coloured railway carriages.View down the side of the red and cream coloured railway carriages.

On the platform, having arrived at Douglas railway station. The steam train stationary in front.On the platform, having arrived at Douglas railway station. The steam train stationary in front.

Looking along a path heading to the door of Peel Cathedral (also known as the Cathedral Church of Saint German). The church was built between 1879 and 1884. It was made a cathedral by Act of Tynwald in 1980.Looking along a path heading to the door of Peel Cathedral (also known as the Cathedral Church of Saint German). The church was built between 1879 and 1884. It was made a cathedral by Act of Tynwald in 1980.

The main doorway into the cathedral: a pair of quite large wooden doors going into a Gothic arch at the top.The main doorway into the cathedral: a pair of quite large wooden doors going into a Gothic arch at the top.

A residential street in Peel. White and cream painted houses.A residential street in Peel. White and cream painted houses.

View across the beach in Peel Bay. On the far side, Peel Castle, lit by the setting sun.View across the beach in Peel Bay. On the far side, Peel Castle, lit by the setting sun.

Another vista over the beach. The sunset reflected on the sand.Another vista over the beach. The sunset reflected on the sand.

Tatiana looking across the beach from railings on the promenade.Tatiana looking across the beach from railings on the promenade.

Sunset over Peel Castle. The castle a silhouette beneath the sky lit in shades of yellow and orange.Sunset over Peel Castle. The castle a silhouette beneath the sky lit in shades of yellow and orange.

On the beach by the sea shore.On the beach by the sea shore.

Tatiana leaning against a reddish coloured stone wall.Tatiana leaning against a reddish coloured stone wall.